Thursday, December 27, 2007

Operation Get Behind the Beaners

When it comes to satire-as-prophecy, it's hard to beat The Onion, but the South Park movie comes pretty close. I'm thinking of the scene where the invasion of Canada is to be led by an all-black infantry battalion, and is called "Operation Get Behind the Darkies."

The only thing they got wrong was the color of the human shields.

First, there were fliers seeking recruits being handed out to Latino-looking youths at shopping centers. They originally offered citizenship in return for a year’s service in Irag. That was then… now, they are requiring a year and a half in Iraq.

Idelfonso said he was not going to fight in a war that was not Mexico’s war. It has nothing to do with him, or his country. He packed his bags, took out his car keys and drove back to live with his parents in El Burrión.

He is not the only one in this small town. Carlos Mario Perez came back two years ago, as the the conditions for American soldiers in Iraq got worse and then, as American citizens rejected the war and stopped enlisting, the recruitment campaign began focusing on residents.

The first to be “invited” was his older brother Orlando, 34 years old and the father of two. Orlando turned down the offer, but it was obvious that immigrant recruit were much more likely to be put into a conflict zone. ...

Carlos Mario related ...that in March 2003, when the Americans first invaded Iraq, invitations to the Mexicans to enlist began arriving at his work center. He feared harassment by the recruiters, who said that military service was obligatory for regularizing his residency.

[Translation by The MexFiles, which is where you should go to get news more substantive than my parents' vacation photos.]

I suppose that, for better or worse, this is an admission that "the troops" (God bless 'em) aren't really cutting it, so the Administration is forced to turn to the hated Mexicans to fight their beloved war. The Mexicans (being smart enough never to have invaded another country for no good reason) don't appear to be buying it. The front-page photo accompanying the El Universal story translated above shows a soldier on patrol in Iraq, over the caption "CANNON FODDER."

So far, no one has written to El Universal canceling their subscription.

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