Monday, July 14, 2008

Crucify the Lord. Take The Cannoli.

Querétaro, as we may have mentioned like 1,000 times, is a bit clergy-heavy. Not that you'd necessarily know this from walking down the street though, because, as we understand it [corrections welcome] clergy members are prohibited by law from wearing their vestments out in public - a remnant of the old days when stringing up priests was something of a national pastime. There doesn't seem to be any prohibition on priests meddling in public policy, of course, so Diocese of Querétaro spokesman Fr. José Morales Flores gets a lot of face time on tv and in the papers here, usually attired, as you see in this photo, like a mafia capo or a waste management executive. You come for a sit-down with this guy, you bring your guardian angel, capice?

Update: Asketh for corrections, and ye shall receive. The Mexfiles dude explains in comments that

Constitutional Article 24 was amended in 1992. There are institutional restrictions on Churches, but the only restrictions on clerics is that they can't inherit money or property from non-relations, and they can't run for public office. Clerics can wear distinctive garb if they so chose, but they are... ahem... out of the habit.

Presumably nothing in Article 24 (As Amended) requires priests to buy their clothes from the Godfellas collection, which means Fr. Morales went out, tried on that outfit, said, "Damn, I look good!" and laid down some plastic. We find this more confusing than the whole Divine Trinity thing.

In other "no restrictions on clergy" news, the Cardinal of Guadalajara gave a sermon yesterday suggesting that it would be totally God's will if the Mexican Army (that'd be these guys) were to patrol the streets of every city and state in the Republic. We believe he was wearing vestments at the time.

6 comments:

MexFilees said...

Not to be a pedantic weenie, but Constitutional Article 24 was amended in 1992. There are institutional restrictions on Churches, but the only restrictions n clerics is that they can't inherit money or property from non-relations, and they can't run for public office.

Clerics can wear distinctive garb if they so chose, but they are... ahem... out of the habit. I think the only clerics I've ever seen with Roman collars have been a couple visiting Russian Orthodox priests, and one or two foreigners (who may have been clueless conmen, for all I know).

There's a small scene in "Padre Amaro" where Amaro has to find a black shirt when he goes to visit the Bishop, and borrow a Roman collar, which seems to be about normal for Mexican clerics.

Burro Hall said...

That's not pedantic, Richard, that's helpful. In the old days, I used to actually research some of this stuff. Now I just wait for you to correct it in comments. I'd probably owe you 40% of this sites profits...I mean, if there were any, of course.

Chris P said...

If only I had had a choice to dress like that--I never would have left!

Burro Hall said...

Yes, it's a shame that this sartorial option is unavailable to Italian-American men.

Anonymous said...

To Chris P -
Oh really?
- your wife

Anonymous said...

Good shot, Jullie!