Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Picture This

A couple of weeks ago we were at one of the little second-hand shops down the road, and were surprised to see this set of four framed black and while photographs of Adolf Hitler in various poses - looking pensive, poring over maps, walking through Paris, etc.


(Okay, so it's not a great shot - they don't like picture-taking.)

The thing about these shops is that all of the junk in them is basically stuff that locals come in and get rid of. Which means someone in Querétaro had, until recently, four framed black and while photographs of Adolf Hitler in various poses - looking pensive, poring over maps, walking through Paris, etc. This certainly seems...odd to us. We don't know who it is, but since today is the Fuhrer's 121st birthday, we suggest keeping an eye out for fireworks, loud music, and other signs of celebration.

5 comments:

Gary Denness said...

The Nazis clearly don't mean as much/the same thing to Mexicans as they do to peeps from the UK or US and elsewhere. I often see motorcyclists wearing old Nazi helmets and there's a fair amount of Nazi memorabilia to be found in street markets in DF. I once found this...

http://garydenness.co.uk/2009/11/29/street-antiques/

Burro Hall said...

Oh, I get that. A few years ago I saw a sweet-looking housewife in WalMart wearing a red sweater embroidered with a swastika so large it would have embarrassed George Lincoln Rockwell. I'm sure it seemed like a pretty cool design to her. But this feels a little different. I have no strong feelings about East African strongmen, but if I had four framed photos of Idi Amin hanging in my living room, you'd be right to ask questions.

Mexfiles said...

The photos may have come from an old Synachista... the Mexican fascist group that later was absorbed into PAN. While the Synachists were more or less modeled on Franco's falangism, there was some support for the Nazis (notably José Vasconcelos), mostly because the Germans were and are much better liked in Latin America than the U.S. or Britain.

Most of the "nazi helmets" one sees are old Mexican army and police surplus... Mexico manufactures military uniforms, and produced a lot of"German style" helmets that were also exported throughout Latin America. The Bolivian Army used to buy used West German uniforms which -- Bolivians being much shorter than Germans -- made parades kinda like watching a school dress-up event.

Anonymous said...

In Guadalajara there are several older houses with swastika decorations on the outside walls. One notable one is in Calle Alemania but is clearly from the pre-nazi times.

mexicomystic said...

There may have been nazi sympathizers but there were also well known anti fascists like Diego Rivera... check his murals in the Palacio Nacional.
Or maybe Adolf did escape on a submarine and is hiding out in Mexico.
I once saw a VW with a leather seat that had a swastika on it in Puebla...but then theres many Germans at the VW plant there.